THE POWER THAT MADE THE BODY, HEALS THE BODY. IT HAPPENS NO OTHER WAY.”

 

OVERVIEW:

Chiropractic health care focuses primarily on spinal function and its relationship to the nervous system and overall health. The science of chiropractic is based on the premise that good health depends, in part, on a normally functioning nervous system. Chiropractic principle emphasizes that the body is a self-regulating, self-healing, organism and that the body function is controlled and coordinated by the brain, spinal cord, and nerves that branch out throughout the body. The chiropractic approach to better health is to locate and remove spinal dysfunction  and nerve interference, returning the body to its natural state of health & wellness without the use of drugs or surgery. We will promote chiropractic education to the public as well as provide top quality chiropractic and rehabilitative care enhanced by physiotherapy, nutritional advice, diet and exercise. 

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CHIROPRACTIC EDUCATION: 

Educational requirements for doctors of chiropractic are among the most stringent of any of the health care professions.

The typical applicant at a chiropractic college has already acquired  four years of pre-medical undergraduate college education, including courses in biology, inorganic and organic chemistry, physics, biomechanics, anatomy, physiology, psychology and related lab work. Once accepted into an accredited chiropractic college, the requirements become even more demanding — four to five academic years of professional study are the standard. Because of the hands-on nature of chiropractic, and the intricate adjusting techniques, a significant portion of time is spent in clinical training.

Doctors of Chiropractic — who are licensed to practice in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and in many nations around the world — undergo a rigorous education in the healing sciences, similar to that of medical doctors. In some areas, such as anatomy, physiology, and rehabilitation, they receive more intensive education than most medical doctors or physical therapists. 

Like other primary health care doctors, chiropractic students spend a significant portion of their curriculum studying clinical subjects related to evaluating and caring for patients. Typically, as part of their professional training, they must complete a minimum of a one-year clinical-based program dealing with actual patient care. In total, the curriculum includes a minimum of 4,200 hours of classroom, laboratory and clinical experience. The course of study is approved by an accrediting agency which is fully recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. This has been the case for more than 25 years.

Before they are allowed to practice, Doctors of Chiropractic must pass 5 National Board examinations (NBCE Parts 1-4 and Physiotherapy) and become state-licensed as well. Chiropractic colleges also offer post-graduate continuing education programs in specialty fields ranging from sports injuries and occupational health to orthopedics and neurology. These programs allow chiropractors to specialize in a healthcare discipline or meet state re-licensure requirements.

This extensive education prepares doctors of chiropractic to diagnose health care problems, treat the problems when they are within their scope of practice and refer patients to other health care practitioners when appropriate.

CHIROPRACTIC HISTORY:

The roots of chiropractic care can be traced all the way back to the beginning of recorded time. Writings from China and Greece written in 2700 B.C. and 1500 B.C. mention spinal manipulation and the maneuvering of the lower extremities to ease low back pain. Hippocrates, the Greek physician, who lived from 460 to 357 B.C., also published texts detailing the importance of chiropractic care. In one of his writings he declares, "Get knowledge of the spine, for this is the requisite for many diseases".

In the United States, the practice of spinal manipulation began gaining momentum in the late nineteenth century. In 1895, Daniel David Palmer founded the Chiropractic profession in Davenport, Iowa. Palmer was well read in medical journals of his time and had great knowledge of the developments that were occurring throughout the world regarding anatomy and physiology. In 1897, Daniel David Palmer went on to begin the Palmer School of Chiropractic, which has continued to be one of the most prominent chiropractic colleges in the nation.

Throughout the twentieth century, doctors of chiropractic gained legal recognition in all fifty states. A continuing recognition and respect for the chiropractic profession in the United States has led to growing support for chiropractic care all over the world. The research that has emerged from " around the world" has yielded incredibly influential results, which have changed, shaped and molded perceptions of chiropractic care. The report, Chiropractic in New Zealand published in 1979 strongly supported the efficacy of chiropractic care and elicited medical cooperation in conjunction with chiropractic care. The 1993 Manga study published in Canada investigated the cost effectiveness of chiropractic care. The results of this study concluded that chiropractic care would save hundreds of millions of dollars annually with regard to work disability payments and direct health care costs.

“MEDICINE IS THE STUDY OF DISEASE
AND WHAT CAUSES A MAN TO DIE.

CHIROPRACTIC IS THE STUDY OF HEALTH
AND WHAT CAUSES A MAN TO LIVE.”
— BJ PALMER

References
1- Meeker W, Haldeman H. Chiropractic: A Profession at the Crossroads of Mainstream and Alternative Medicine. 
Annals of Internal Medicine 2002, Vol 136, No 3.
2- American Physical Therapy Association. 2005-2006 Fact Sheet, Physical Therapist Education Programs. January 2007.

-http://www.acatoday.org/level3_css.cfm?T1ID=13&T2ID=61&T3ID=151